skip to Main Content
The Context

Every year, millions of people are forced to leave their homes because of floods, tropical storms, droughts, glacier melting, earthquakes and other natural hazards. Many find refuge within their own country, but some have to move abroad. Scientists warn that climate change is projected to increase displacement in the future. Large-scale displacements have devastating effects on people. They create complex challenges that call for urgent partnerships and action beyond traditional silos.

Our Response

The objective of the Platform on Disaster Displacement is to follow-up on the work started by the Nansen Initiative, and to implement the recommendations of the Protection Agenda, a toolbox to better prevent and prepare for displacement  and to respond to situations when people are forced to find refuge, within their own country or across the border. The Platform builds partnerships between policymakers, practitioners and researchers and constitute a multi-stakeholder forum for dialogue, information sharing as well as policy and normative development.

Explore Further

Disaster Displacement at the 2019 Global Platform on Disaster Risk Reduction

Disaster Displacement at the 2019 Global Platform on Disaster Risk Reduction

Geneva, Switzerland 13-17 May 2019 – Disaster Displacement will be a prominent topic at the 2019 Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (GP19), notably addressed in a working session on disaster displacement and DRR and a side event on the human faces…

Interview: Deciding whether to migrate and where to go

Interview: Deciding whether to migrate and where to go

Climate-induced migration has been a focus of political and public discussion for quite some time. Law professor Walter Kaelin has campaigned for years to get it onto the international agenda.

The Role of Free Movement of Persons Agreements in Addressing Disaster Displacement – A Study of Africa

The Role of Free Movement of Persons Agreements in Addressing Disaster Displacement – A Study of Africa

This study, commissioned by PDD, considers the potential for free movement agreements in Africa to address these protection needs, through: access to territory, status and rights during stay, and opportunities for lasting solutions.

Back To Top